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We’ve just seen the first two contests of the 2016 elections, and just in time, there’s a new paper from the […]

We’ve just seen the first two contests of the 2016 elections, and just in time, there’s a new paper from the University of California, San Diego, that shows what we already suspected. That is, voter ID laws dampen turnout for minorities.

Voter ID laws adversely affected the turnout of minorities, and particularly that of Latinos, the paper found. The study also revealed that turnout among Democrats was disproportionately affected, backing up claims of a political motivation behind the laws, which have been overwhelmingly championed by GOP legislators.

It is the first comprehensive study that’s been done over many election cycles that very clearly shows how minority voters are affected, and how they’re adversely and disproportionately affected compared to their white counterparts, the authors say.

Lajevardi, a Ph.D. candidate in UC-San Diego’s department of political science, is joined on the study by lead author Zoltan L. Hajnal , a political science professor there and with Lindsay Nielson, a post-Doctoral fellow. They examined not just the turnout, but the gap among racial groups compared with white voters. Looking at states with strict photo ID laws in elections from 2006 through 2012, they found, where they are enacted, racial, and ethnic minorities are less apt to vote.

Not only have the numbers of states passing voter ID laws grown considerably since the Supreme Court approved of Indiana’s photo ID law in 2008, the requirements in the laws have also gotten stricter. The paper’s authors thus focused attention on “strict” photo ID laws, meaning those “that prevent the voter from casting a regular ballot if they cannot present appropriate identification.” Seven states have strict photo ID laws in place, by the study’s count.

In general elections, states with strict photo ID laws show a Latino turnout 10.3 points lower than in states without them, the study showed. The law also affected turnout in primary elections, where Latino turnout decreased by 6.3 points and Black turnout by 1.6 points.

    “The Daily Show” tried to dissect the racist tendencies of the adult film industry on last night’s episode. […]

 

 

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“The Daily Show” tried to dissect the racist tendencies of the adult film industry on last night’s episode. The report from Roy Wood Jr. is the latest in their coverage of Black History Month.

“I have a dream that one day there’ll be a porn that welcomes every color, no stereotypes,” Wood said after talking with multiple performers.

Some highlights: There are performers who won’t do interracial porn because their parents wouldn’t approve. In fact there are several things (we won’t mention here) that they would rather do before performing with a person of color.

Watch the Daily Show clip here.

27
Jan

#ActorsSoWhite

POSTED BY Admin POSTED IN Uncategorized POST TAGGED African American, film, media

First, the outcry over the lack of people of color in the Oscar Nominations – leading the Academy to follow […]

First, the outcry over the lack of people of color in the Oscar Nominations – leading the Academy to follow the dramatic change in membership qualifications to increase diversity – and now, this. A biopic of Michael Jackson is going to be played by Joseph Fiennes. Who, as you may recall, is white.

Sure, you can say that Michael Jackson’s skin became whiter over the years, and his nose became, well, odd but thinner, too.

But, just no:

Even long after he had made his physical transformation and black people accused him of racial self-hatred, he was still a guy who spoke unabashedly about how poorly the music industry has treated black artists in comparison to white ones. And even more obviously, you don’t cast a white actor to play Michael Jackson, because you’ve learned from the years of Hollywood whitewashing leading all the way up to last year, when Emma Stone was cast as an Asian character in Aloha.

Just say no.

22
Jan

Nina Simone didn’t sing these lyrics, but today to be young, gifted and black means being cheated out of the […]

Nina Simone didn’t sing these lyrics, but today to be young, gifted and black means being cheated out of the “gifted” track, according to an essay at National Public Radio.

The essay, “To Be Young, Gifted And Black it helps to have a black teacher,” looks at a recent study on the low numbers of students of color in gifted programs. The study notes that the students are “high-achieving,” yet under-represented.

A new, national study finds that black students are about half as likely as white students to be put on a “gifted” track — even when they have comparable test scores. Previous surveys have found a similar gap, but the researchers here — Jason Grissom and Christopher Redding at Vanderbilt University — looked only at students attending schools with gifted programs. So the disparity can’t be accounted for by, say, the fact that black students are more likely to attend under-resourced schools.

Only one factor erased this disparity between students: the race of their teachers.

Some reactions in comments section of the NPR Ed article, ask if the writer is calling for a return to segregation. Nope. In case it wasn’t clear, it’s a call to usher more teachers into the education field who are able to relate to black students.

14
Jan

#oscarssowhite

POSTED BY Admin POSTED IN Uncategorized POST TAGGED African American, Oscars, race

And the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences has done it again. It’s proved that it may be many […]

And the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences has done it again. It’s proved that it may be many things, but it is not reflective of the U.S.

Actors of color were shut out of the nominations again. And people are noticing. There is a #oscarssowhite twitter account. In fact all of social media is a-twitter about the whiteness of the nominees.

It isn’t like there weren’t any great performances of people of color. As the media site Vulture points out, candidates Idris Elba (Beasts of No Nation), Benicio Del Toro (Sicario), and Michael B. Jordan (Creed) all received awards buzz in the weeks leading up to the nominations (Jordan took home a National Society of Film Critics award for Best Actor) but none were nominated. And:

In addition to the individual snubs, the Academy didn’t recognize Straight Outta Compton, a movie with a largely black ensemble, in either the acting or Best Picture categories, leaving us with no Best Picture nominees that feature a nonwhite lead or a predominantly nonwhite cast. (Straight Outta Compton did receive a nomination for Best Original Screenplay — which was credited to four white writers.)

Part of the problem is that the Academy itself doesn’t look like America. It’s members are overwhelmingly white, male, and older. From the LA Times:

A Los Angeles Times study found that academy voters are markedly less diverse than the moviegoing public, and even more monolithic than many in the film industry may suspect. Oscar voters are nearly 94% Caucasian and 77% male, The Times found. Blacks are about 2% of the academy, and Latinos are less than 2%.Oscar voters have a median age of 62, the study showed. People younger than 50 constitute just 14% of the membership.

So there it is, then.

Here’s a survey that should take a bite out of the persistent meme that blacks are the Angriest Americans. American […]

Here’s a survey that should take a bite out of the persistent meme that blacks are the Angriest Americans. American Rage, a survey commissioned by NBC and Esquire magazine, showed that whites and Republicans are the angriest Americans.

In a response to the question “About how often do you hear or read something in the news that makes you angry?” 73 percent of whites said they get angry at least once a day, in contrast to 66 percent of Hispanics and 56 percent of blacks.

Seventy-seven percent of Republicans also said they get angry at least once a day, compared to 67 percent of Democrats. Fifty-two percent of Americans said the American Dream “once held true but does not anymore.” Thirty-nine percent think that race relations have become worse since President Obama was elected.

From Esquire:

Indeed, despite having what many would consider a more legitimate case for feeling angry, black Americans are generally less angry than whites. Though they take great issue with the way they are treated by both society in general and the police in particular, blacks are also more likely than whites to believe that the American dream is still alive.

There are some other seemingly contradictory findings about demographics and views of Black Americans:

- Blacks are more likely than whites and Hispanics to think that the American Dream still holds true.
- Blacks are more likely to think that the recent killings of African American men by police are part of a larger pattern in the police’s treatment of African Americans.

Read more about the methodology here.

Despite nearly a quarter of U.S. Latinos living in poverty, the group as a whole has a higher average life […]

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Despite nearly a quarter of U.S. Latinos living in poverty, the group as a whole has a higher average life expectancies than white Americans, who have a much lower poverty rate.

This article from Yes magazine has some theories as to why. It’s about Latino traditions of food, community and family bonds.

Author Claudia Kolker took a closer look at such cultural practices for her 2011 book, The Immigrant Advantage. Her book examines why immigrants are often healthier than native-born Americans—a question that continues to be explored. Some credit this perplexing phenomenon to the idea that immigrants must be healthy to migrate. Kolker’s research shows its connection to customs like Danza Azteca: close community bonds, traditional foods, and la cuarentena, a Latin American tradition in which a new mother rests for the first 40 days after giving birth, not lifting a finger except to breastfeed and bond with her child. Kolker also has a hunch that a lack of smoking is a factor, and other researchers agree.

But here’s another paradox. The healthier living advantage is primarily for recent immigrants.

U.S.-born Hispanics face higher prevalence rates for unhealthy behaviors than foreign-born Hispanics: a 72 percent higher smoking rate and a 30 percent higher obesity rate. They also have a 93 percent higher cancer rate, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Timothy Smith, a psychology professor at Brigham Young University, also has studied this scientific wonder and suggests that social bonds and culture do contribute to health. While more research is needed to know for sure, one thing is certain: American assimilation isn’t exactly healthy. “They’re adopting the local culture, which does have some adverse consequences,” he says. “There are positive consequences to health and adverse consequences.”

Read more about the paradox here.

The 2016 election is fascinating and unprecedented for several reasons. One reason is that there are two Latinos running for […]

The 2016 election is fascinating and unprecedented for several reasons. One reason is that there are two Latinos running for the GOP nomination, and are considered to be favorites of the party establishment. Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz are both freshmen senators, both are of Cuban ancestry, and both are sons of immigrants (though they don’t favor an easy pathway to citizenship for newcomers).

But that’s where the similarities end as far as how they wear their cultural heritage. This New York Times piece says that in their approach to their Hispanic identities — traits that can make or break their success in courting both Latino and non-Latino voters — the two sharply diverge, starting with their names and how Ted Cruze chose to anglicize his name.

His preference for Ted, a suggestion from Mr. Cruz’s Irish-American mother, infuriated his father, Rafael, who in 1957 fled Cuba for Texas after being arrested and beaten by agents for Fulgencio Batista, the Cuban dictator. “He viewed it as a rejection of him and his heritage, which was not my intention,” Mr. Cruz wrote. For two years, his father refused to call him Ted. Today, Mr. Cruz serves as his son’s Spanish-speaking surrogate.

The name change is but one example of how Mr. Cruz has de-emphasized his Latino identity. Unlike Mr. Rubio, Mr. Cruz had only his father and a few relatives to connect him to the island, its language and traditions. Once his father became a born-again Christian, religion, not ethnicity, appeared to dominate the Cruz household.

“His approach to all the people with whom we interacted was who they were, not what they were,” said David K. Panton, Mr. Cruz’s former roommate at Princeton University and Harvard Law School.

On the stump, Mr. Cruz has embraced his Cuban father’s story, more for what it says about America than what it says about immigrants. His father fled Cuba with $100 sewn into his underwear and worked as a dishwasher to help pay tuition at the University of Texas at Austin. “America, quite simply, saved my father,” Mr. Cruz wrote.

The story is a poignant one, but many Latinos have said it falls flat for one reason: The pride Mr. Cruz feels for his father is not one he extends to the larger immigrant community.

We would say to the GOP if they’re listening that they need to have a stronger understanding of the Latino communities in the U.S. There is a lot of talk in political circles about how Cruz or Rubio would attract Latinos just based on their roots. But the Latino community is hardly monolithic and, even more to the point, many Mexican-Americans could give a damn that a Cuban-American running for President.

If just having a Latino name on the ticket is the party’s idea of Latino outreach, they are going to be severely disappointed.

As if the news weren’t depressing enough these days, here is a study showing that minority teens are less hopeful […]

As if the news weren’t depressing enough these days, here is a study showing that minority teens are less hopeful they’ll see the age of 35 than white teens.

In a recently published study in the journal Health and Social Behavior, researchers mined the data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health — a cohort that initially included 20,745 teens questioned every few years between 1994 and 2008 on topics regarding their health and well-being.

Participants were asked how likely they were to live to age 35. The response choices ranged from “almost no chance” to “almost certain.”

Foreign-born Mexicans were the least optimistic, followed by second-generation Mexicans, then black teens, and then Puerto Ricans. Asian teens were also “significantly less optimistic about future survival relative to whites,” the study notes. The only outlier among the minority groups were the American-born Cubans, whose optimism for survival didn’t look all that different from that of the white teens.

Even controlling for neighborhood factors like violence and poverty, the authors found an optimism gap between black and white participants. Black youth, at least, appear to believe the world is more dangerous to them, regardless of where they live.

The one bit of hope in the study was a U-shaped curve for all the racial and ethnic categories. The older the teens of all races grew, the more confident they were of their survival,

There’s a fascinating article in The Atlantic about the plight of minority millennials. Black and Latino millennials, specifically, are less […]

There’s a fascinating article in The Atlantic about the plight of minority millennials. Black and Latino millennials, specifically, are less likely to receive parental financial help, and more likely to give assistance to parents.

Recent polls indicate that a large portion of Millennials receive financial help from parents. At least 40 percent of the 1,000 Millennials (ages 18 to 34) polled in a March USA Today/Bank of America poll get help from parents on everyday expenses. A Clark University poll indicated an even higher number, with almost three-quarters of parents reporting that they provide their Millennial children with financial support. Another survey saw nearly a third of Baby Boomers paying for Millennials’ medical expenses. A quarter of Boomers subsidized “other expenses” so their Millennial offspring could save money. Black and Hispanic Americans are less likely to be the recipients of this type of support.

Ironically, even though black and Hispanic Millennials are less likely to receive financial support from parents, their parents are more likely than white parents to expect their kids to help financially support them later on.

We wonder if this survey will do anything to squash that meme that “if those lazy minorities would just work harder they’d succeed.” Safe money is on “no.”