Latino
10
Jan

Why is U.S. Hispanic suicide rate so low?

POSTED BY Admin POSTED IN Uncategorized POST TAGGED 1950s, 2016, 2020, 9-1-1, Aaron Schlossberg, ads, African American, AirBNB, American, Americans, Asia, Asian, Asian-American, Asian-Americans, Asians, banking, Ben Carson, bias, bigotry, bilingual, bisexual, black, Black history, Black Lives Matter, black men, Blacks, Brexit, Bush, census, census 2020, Chinese, Chris Rock, civil rights, colectivismo, commencement, community, Confederate, Congress, conservative, culture, David Dao, democrat, demographics, disparity, District of Columbia, diversity, economics, education, election, election 2016, elections, electoral college, Emma Stone, employment, English, ethnicity, Europe, evangelical, family, fear, film, food, Fox News, Fresh Kitchen, gay, George Wallace, German, German-American, hate, hate crime, Hawaii, health, health care, health insurance, Hillary Clinton, Hispanic, history, Hollywood, housing crisis, ICE, immigrant, immigrants, immigration, immigration and nationality act, immigration attitudes, immigration trends, Indian, JFK, jobs, John Cho, justice, kavanaugh, Kennedy, Korean, language, Latino, Latino millennial, Latinx, lesbian, LGBT, MAGA, marketing, Martin Luther King, McCain, McKinley Texas, media, media coverage, Mexican, Mexicans, Mexico, midterm elections, midterms, Migrant Caravan, millennial, Millennials, minority, mixed race, model minority, money, mortality, multicultural, multiculturalism, Muslim, Muslim-American, nationalism, New American Dimensions, Oakland BBQ, Obama, Orlando, Oscars, Pew, Philadelphia, police, politics, Poll, polling, polls, president, Pride, pride parades, progressive, psychology, Puerto Rico, race, racial, racial bias, racial disparity, racial profiling, racism, racist, representation, Republican, research, RFK, Rust Belt, SCOTUS, Senate, sexual orientation, sexual racism, shooting, slavery, South, South Carolina, South Carolina shooting, Spanish, stand your ground, Starbucks, statehood, stereotype, Stonewall, Stonewall riots, stress, subprime, suicide, Supreme Court, tariffs, teens, trade, transgender, Trudeau, Trump, Tuskegee, TV, U.S., Uncategorized, undocumented, United, Univision, violence, voting, white, white Americans, white history, White House, white majority, white nationalism, white nationals, white resentment, white supremacy, White women, White working class, whites, xenophobia, Yale dorm

There is some good news and bad news about suicides in the U.S. Across the country, suicides have increased nearly 30 percent since the turn of the century. That’s the bad news.  But there’s good news for Hispanics, at least in California. Although Latinos face economic disadvantages and other stress in their lives, their suicide rate is less than one-third that of non-Hispanic whites, according to research compiled by Kaiser Health News

In California, the suicide rate for whites was 19 per 100,000 people in 2016, and the rate for Hispanics was 5.5 per 100,000, according to the state Department of Public Health. (Hispanics can be of any race.) The overall suicide rate in California in 2016 was 10.9 per 100,000.

Why?

Experts attribute the relatively low suicide rate among Latinos to the culture’s strong family and community support systems, which appear to bolster emotional resilience.

Latinos in California and across the U.S. face obstacles that can affect their health and well-being. They earn less than non-Hispanic whites, and are more likely to lack health insurance coverage. And recent immigrants face the stresses of moving to a new country, and, though there is no research to gauge how this affects them, an Administration hostile to immigration.

It’s practice of “colectivismo,” the or relationships built through extended family, work colleagues and friends, that gives Latinos an emotional safety net, experts say.

But that’s not the whole story. As Latinos become more assimilated, the more their risk of suicide goes up. A study published in 2014 in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry found that suicidal thoughts and attempts increased as Latinos spent more years in the U.S. and started losing fluency in Spanish and connections to Latino social networks and identity.

07
Jan

Moving beyond assumptions, Latino edition

POSTED BY Admin POSTED IN Uncategorized POST TAGGED 1950s, 2016, 2020, 9-1-1, Aaron Schlossberg, ads, African American, AirBNB, American, Americans, Asia, Asian, Asian-American, Asian-Americans, Asians, banking, Ben Carson, bias, bigotry, bilingual, bisexual, black, Black history, Black Lives Matter, black men, Blacks, Brexit, Bush, census, census 2020, Chinese, Chris Rock, civil rights, colectivismo, commencement, community, Confederate, Congress, conservative, culture, David Dao, democrat, demographics, disparity, District of Columbia, diversity, economics, education, election, election 2016, elections, electoral college, Emma Stone, employment, English, ethnicity, Europe, evangelical, family, fear, film, food, Fox News, Fresh Kitchen, gay, George Wallace, German, German-American, hate, hate crime, Hawaii, health, health care, health insurance, Hillary Clinton, Hispanic, history, Hollywood, housing crisis, ICE, immigrant, immigrants, immigration, immigration and nationality act, immigration attitudes, immigration trends, Indian, JFK, jobs, John Cho, justice, kavanaugh, Kennedy, Korean, language, Latino, Latino millennial, Latinx, lesbian, LGBT, MAGA, marketing, Martin Luther King, McCain, McKinley Texas, media, media coverage, Mexican, Mexicans, Mexico, midterm elections, midterms, Migrant Caravan, millennial, Millennials, minority, mixed race, model minority, money, mortality, multicultural, multiculturalism, Muslim, Muslim-American, nationalism, New American Dimensions, Oakland BBQ, Obama, Orlando, Oscars, Pew, Philadelphia, police, politics, Poll, polling, polls, president, Pride, pride parades, progressive, psychology, Puerto Rico, race, racial, racial bias, racial disparity, racial profiling, racism, racist, representation, Republican, research, RFK, Rust Belt, SCOTUS, Senate, sexual orientation, sexual racism, shooting, slavery, South, South Carolina, South Carolina shooting, Spanish, stand your ground, Starbucks, statehood, stereotype, Stonewall, Stonewall riots, stress, subprime, suicide, Supreme Court, tariffs, teens, trade, transgender, Trudeau, Trump, Tuskegee, TV, U.S., Uncategorized, undocumented, United, Univision, violence, voting, white, white Americans, white history, White House, white majority, white nationalism, white nationals, white resentment, white supremacy, White women, White working class, whites, xenophobia, Yale dorm

We’re always happy to report on multicultural research that someone else has done, especially when they’ve done it right. That is, a report that’s not just strung together observations and assumptions.

Gabriel Acevedo, sociology professor at St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, told the Texas Standard radio show that political scientists and strategists to marketers, when trying to figure out how to reach Latinos don’t actually ASK Latinos directly about their preferences. And not surprisingly that leads to a pile of misconceptions. Acevedo just released the report “Latinos in America” based on responses from 2,500 self-identified Hispanic Latinos, and learned some things that marketers and demographers ought to know. And he did it by asking questions. Some of the key takeaways from the survey squash some myths – though surely not myths that those familiar with New American Dimensions hold – including:

- Evangelicals are not just suburban white Americans or rural Southern Americans. Rather, the highest share of self-proclaimed evangelicals is actually found among Latinos, not whites. The survey found that, while Latinos are still majority Catholic, a large and growing contingent are evangelicals.

- Dispelling the notion that White Americans are conservative, African Americans and Latinos are liberal, Acevedo found that many Latinos’ political support is up for grabs. They are not committed to either party.

The biggest conclusion, Acevedo told Texas Standard is that “Hispanic’ is a complicated term. I see many of you nodding your head in agreement.

“We know that, for instance, Cuban Americans in parts of South Florida, parts of New Jersey, are much more conservative Republican than maybe Puerto Rican Latinos living in New York City. That diversity within the Hispanic Latino community also gives this political diversity.” 

Acevedo added that Latinos, not unlike other American groups, tend to align their social and political views according to age cohort. That is, on hot button issues like abortion, same-sex marriage and gun control, Latino millennials are more likely to hold progressive views than their parents. Not shocking, of course, but you would be surprised at how many marketers are surprised by findings like this.

One thing the survey didn’t account for was generational status. That is, whether being first, second, or third generation affects the views of Hispanic Americans. But New American Dimensions has covered that topic. Nothing wrong with a little shameless self-promotion now and then.

(Photo credit: KUT)

17
Jan

Pew: Asians outnumber Hispanics among immigrants

POSTED BY Admin POSTED IN Uncategorized POST TAGGED 1950s, 2016, 2020, 9-1-1, Aaron Schlossberg, ads, African American, AirBNB, American, Americans, Asia, Asian, Asian-American, Asian-Americans, Asians, banking, Ben Carson, bias, bigotry, bilingual, bisexual, black, Black history, Black Lives Matter, black men, Blacks, Brexit, Bush, census, census 2020, Chinese, Chris Rock, civil rights, colectivismo, commencement, community, Confederate, Congress, conservative, culture, David Dao, democrat, demographics, disparity, District of Columbia, diversity, economics, education, election, election 2016, elections, electoral college, Emma Stone, employment, English, ethnicity, Europe, evangelical, family, fear, film, food, Fox News, Fresh Kitchen, gay, George Wallace, German, German-American, hate, hate crime, Hawaii, health, health care, health insurance, Hillary Clinton, Hispanic, history, Hollywood, housing crisis, ICE, immigrant, immigrants, immigration, immigration and nationality act, immigration attitudes, immigration trends, Indian, JFK, jobs, John Cho, justice, kavanaugh, Kennedy, Korean, language, Latino, Latino millennial, Latinx, lesbian, LGBT, MAGA, marketing, Martin Luther King, McCain, McKinley Texas, media, media coverage, Mexican, Mexicans, Mexico, midterm elections, midterms, Migrant Caravan, millennial, Millennials, minority, mixed race, model minority, money, mortality, multicultural, multiculturalism, Muslim, Muslim-American, nationalism, New American Dimensions, Oakland BBQ, Obama, Orlando, Oscars, Pew, Philadelphia, police, politics, Poll, polling, polls, president, Pride, pride parades, progressive, psychology, Puerto Rico, race, racial, racial bias, racial disparity, racial profiling, racism, racist, representation, Republican, research, RFK, Rust Belt, SCOTUS, Senate, sexual orientation, sexual racism, shooting, slavery, South, South Carolina, South Carolina shooting, Spanish, stand your ground, Starbucks, statehood, stereotype, Stonewall, Stonewall riots, stress, subprime, suicide, Supreme Court, tariffs, teens, trade, transgender, Trudeau, Trump, Tuskegee, TV, U.S., Uncategorized, undocumented, United, Univision, violence, voting, white, white Americans, white history, White House, white majority, white nationalism, white nationals, white resentment, white supremacy, White women, White working class, whites, xenophobia, Yale dorm

While the discussion over immigration, legal and illegal, devolves further into a cesspool of anti-hispanic rhetoric and tantrums over building a wall on our southern border, a shift in who is coming to the U.S. has been in effect for a few years. A recent Pew Research Center survey shows a long-term trend is continuing: that is, more Asians are migrating to the U.S. than Hispanics.

More than 1 million immigrants arrive in the U.S. each year. In 2016, the top country of origin for new immigrants coming into the U.S. was India, with 126,000 people, followed by Mexico (124,000), China (121,000) and Cuba (41,000).

By race and ethnicity, more Asian immigrants than Hispanic immigrants have arrived in the U.S. each year since 2010. Immigration from Latin America slowed following the Great Recession, particularly from Mexico, which has seen net decreasesin U.S. immigration over the past few years.

Asians are projected to become the largest immigrant group in the U.S. by 2055, surpassing Hispanics. In 2065, Pew Research Center estimates indicate that Asians will make up some 38% of all immigrants; Hispanics, 31%; whites, 20%; and blacks, 9%.

But you don’t hear any anti-Indian or anti-Chinese rhetoric coming out of the President’s mouth or fast little twitter fingers. Not yet, anyway. And while there’s been no polling on it that we can see, it’s a safe bet that most Americans assume that the overwhelming majority of immigrants are coming from Mexico and Central America. There may be several reasons for this. First, the media, just by reporting utterances by the President (and others of his ilk) that the U.S. is being swamped by Hispanics/Latinos on the southern border, without pushing back, reinforces this myth.

And it is a myth. Perhaps it’s an undocumented issue, and far more immigrants from Mexico and Central America are undocumented than from elsewhere. Actually, no. Here, again, from Pew:

The number of apprehensions at the U.S.-Mexico border has sharply decreased over the past decade, from more than 1 million in fiscal 2006 to 408,870 in fiscal 2016. In the first two quarters of fiscal 2017, which started Oct. 1, there have been about 199,000 border patrol apprehensions at the Southwest border, compared with 186,000 for the same period in 2016. Today, more non-Mexicans than Mexicans are apprehended at the border. In fiscal 2016, the apprehensions of Central Americans at the border exceeded that of Mexicans for the second time on record.

Maybe Latino/Hispanic immigrants just have an image problem, made worse by rhetoric by the President (and others of his ilk). Because while nearly two thirds of Americans see immigrants as a boost, rather than a burden to the country, when you break down perceptions of the race of immigrants, the picture is different. From Pew:

Americans also hold more positive views of some immigrant groups than others, according to a 2015 Pew Research Center immigration report. More than four-in-ten Americans expressed mostly positive views of Asian (47%) and European immigrants (44%), yet only a quarter expressed such views of African and Latin American immigrants (26% each). Roughly half of the U.S. public said immigrants are making things better through food, music and the arts (49%), but almost equal shares said immigrants are making crime and the economy worse (50% each).

Interesting to note that Americans view immigration in general far more positively than they view any particular group of immigrants, even the most “popular” immigrant group, Asians. It would be fascinating to dig deeper into these attitudes and where they come from and how they’re reinforced.

There’s much more fascinating immigration data in the Pew report.

03
Jan

Trump sparks surge in Latino voter registration

POSTED BY Admin POSTED IN Uncategorized POST TAGGED 1950s, 2016, 2020, 9-1-1, Aaron Schlossberg, ads, African American, AirBNB, American, Americans, Asia, Asian, Asian-American, Asian-Americans, Asians, banking, Ben Carson, bias, bigotry, bilingual, bisexual, black, Black history, Black Lives Matter, black men, Blacks, Brexit, Bush, census, census 2020, Chinese, Chris Rock, civil rights, colectivismo, commencement, community, Confederate, Congress, conservative, culture, David Dao, democrat, demographics, disparity, District of Columbia, diversity, economics, education, election, election 2016, elections, electoral college, Emma Stone, employment, English, ethnicity, Europe, evangelical, family, fear, film, food, Fox News, Fresh Kitchen, gay, George Wallace, German, German-American, hate, hate crime, Hawaii, health, health care, health insurance, Hillary Clinton, Hispanic, history, Hollywood, housing crisis, ICE, immigrant, immigrants, immigration, immigration and nationality act, immigration attitudes, immigration trends, Indian, JFK, jobs, John Cho, justice, kavanaugh, Kennedy, Korean, language, Latino, Latino millennial, Latinx, lesbian, LGBT, MAGA, marketing, Martin Luther King, McCain, McKinley Texas, media, media coverage, Mexican, Mexicans, Mexico, midterm elections, midterms, Migrant Caravan, millennial, Millennials, minority, mixed race, model minority, money, mortality, multicultural, multiculturalism, Muslim, Muslim-American, nationalism, New American Dimensions, Oakland BBQ, Obama, Orlando, Oscars, Pew, Philadelphia, police, politics, Poll, polling, polls, president, Pride, pride parades, progressive, psychology, Puerto Rico, race, racial, racial bias, racial disparity, racial profiling, racism, racist, representation, Republican, research, RFK, Rust Belt, SCOTUS, Senate, sexual orientation, sexual racism, shooting, slavery, South, South Carolina, South Carolina shooting, Spanish, stand your ground, Starbucks, statehood, stereotype, Stonewall, Stonewall riots, stress, subprime, suicide, Supreme Court, tariffs, teens, trade, transgender, Trudeau, Trump, Tuskegee, TV, U.S., Uncategorized, undocumented, United, Univision, violence, voting, white, white Americans, white history, White House, white majority, white nationalism, white nationals, white resentment, white supremacy, White women, White working class, whites, xenophobia, Yale dorm

Political insiders have wondered for decades how to motivate Latinos to vote. Now they have their answer: Donald Trump.

Trump is poised to win today’s primary in Indiana, and if he does he will have a clear path to the GOP nomination for President, most political experts agree. The dawning realization that the Republican nominee will likely be Trump has led to a spike in voter registration for Latinos. And they’re not registering to vote FOR him either.

Arturo Vargas, executive director of the National Association of Elected and Appointed Officials, projects 13.1 million Hispanics will vote nationwide in 2016, compared to 11.2 million in 2012 and 9.7 million in 2008.

A whopping 80 percent of respondents in a poll of registered Hispanic voters in Colorado and Nevada said Trump’s views on immigration made them less likely to vote for Republicans in November. In Florida, that number was 68 percent.

The figures are sparking confident tones from Democrats, who think their party’s nominee will benefit from a huge advantage in the fall not only in the presidential race but also in battles for the House and Senate.

Many of the newly registered Hispanic voters are in relatively safe states for Democrats (California) and Republicans (Texas). But rising registration rates among Hispanics in swing states of Colorado, Florida and Nevada could make it easier for the Democratic candidate to capture them. If Trump proves especially toxic, even states like Arizona and Georgia could be in play.

It’s Trumps loud demands to close the border that have motivated Latinos, not just the policy itself (most wouldn’t be directly affected by it) but the ugliness of the rhetoric, including Trump’s most ardent supporters.

Does anyone want to take bets on whether Trump will double down on the rhetoric?

22
Jan

The Trump Effect: A Boost in Naturalization

POSTED BY Admin POSTED IN Uncategorized POST TAGGED 1950s, 2016, 2020, 9-1-1, Aaron Schlossberg, ads, African American, AirBNB, American, Americans, Asia, Asian, Asian-American, Asian-Americans, Asians, banking, Ben Carson, bias, bigotry, bilingual, bisexual, black, Black history, Black Lives Matter, black men, Blacks, Brexit, Bush, census, census 2020, Chinese, Chris Rock, civil rights, colectivismo, commencement, community, Confederate, Congress, conservative, culture, David Dao, democrat, demographics, disparity, District of Columbia, diversity, economics, education, election, election 2016, elections, electoral college, Emma Stone, employment, English, ethnicity, Europe, evangelical, family, fear, film, food, Fox News, Fresh Kitchen, gay, George Wallace, German, German-American, hate, hate crime, Hawaii, health, health care, health insurance, Hillary Clinton, Hispanic, history, Hollywood, housing crisis, ICE, immigrant, immigrants, immigration, immigration and nationality act, immigration attitudes, immigration trends, Indian, JFK, jobs, John Cho, justice, kavanaugh, Kennedy, Korean, language, Latino, Latino millennial, Latinx, lesbian, LGBT, MAGA, marketing, Martin Luther King, McCain, McKinley Texas, media, media coverage, Mexican, Mexicans, Mexico, midterm elections, midterms, Migrant Caravan, millennial, Millennials, minority, mixed race, model minority, money, mortality, multicultural, multiculturalism, Muslim, Muslim-American, nationalism, New American Dimensions, Oakland BBQ, Obama, Orlando, Oscars, Pew, Philadelphia, police, politics, Poll, polling, polls, president, Pride, pride parades, progressive, psychology, Puerto Rico, race, racial, racial bias, racial disparity, racial profiling, racism, racist, representation, Republican, research, RFK, Rust Belt, SCOTUS, Senate, sexual orientation, sexual racism, shooting, slavery, South, South Carolina, South Carolina shooting, Spanish, stand your ground, Starbucks, statehood, stereotype, Stonewall, Stonewall riots, stress, subprime, suicide, Supreme Court, tariffs, teens, trade, transgender, Trudeau, Trump, Tuskegee, TV, U.S., Uncategorized, undocumented, United, Univision, violence, voting, white, white Americans, white history, White House, white majority, white nationalism, white nationals, white resentment, white supremacy, White women, White working class, whites, xenophobia, Yale dorm

Donald Trump, the “Mexican illegals are rapists and murderers” candidate, is having an unintended effect on immigration in the U.S. According to multiple news outlets, Latinos are clamoring to get naturalized this year just to vote against him.

Figures from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services show a 14.5% jump in naturalization applications in June-December of 2015 compared with the same six months in the previous year. Federal data does not break down those applications by race, but grass-roots organizations, like the Florida Immigrant Coalition, say their naturalization drives across their swing state are filled primarily by Latinos.

“They feel very unsafe with his words,” said Florida Immigrant Coalition spokesman Ivan Parra. “They want to be respected. For them, it is an emergency.”

We’ve been hearing about this trend from other states as well. And it shouldn’t be surprising. Remember that 2013 Republican party post-mortem, after Latinos shunned Romney in the 2012 election? With Trump at the top of the ticket, if he is, the Republican party could be looking at shutting out Latinos for a generation or two. What does it take to awaken that “sleeping giant”? Maybe a candidate as toxic and hostile to non-whites as Trump.

No wonder the GOP establishment is trying so hard to stop him. Well, good luck with that. Seriously, good luck.

11
Jan

Minority voter suppression, 2016 edition

POSTED BY Admin POSTED IN Uncategorized POST TAGGED 1950s, 2016, 2020, 9-1-1, Aaron Schlossberg, ads, African American, AirBNB, American, Americans, Asia, Asian, Asian-American, Asian-Americans, Asians, banking, Ben Carson, bias, bigotry, bilingual, bisexual, black, Black history, Black Lives Matter, black men, Blacks, Brexit, Bush, census, census 2020, Chinese, Chris Rock, civil rights, colectivismo, commencement, community, Confederate, Congress, conservative, culture, David Dao, democrat, demographics, disparity, District of Columbia, diversity, economics, education, election, election 2016, elections, electoral college, Emma Stone, employment, English, ethnicity, Europe, evangelical, family, fear, film, food, Fox News, Fresh Kitchen, gay, George Wallace, German, German-American, hate, hate crime, Hawaii, health, health care, health insurance, Hillary Clinton, Hispanic, history, Hollywood, housing crisis, ICE, immigrant, immigrants, immigration, immigration and nationality act, immigration attitudes, immigration trends, Indian, JFK, jobs, John Cho, justice, kavanaugh, Kennedy, Korean, language, Latino, Latino millennial, Latinx, lesbian, LGBT, MAGA, marketing, Martin Luther King, McCain, McKinley Texas, media, media coverage, Mexican, Mexicans, Mexico, midterm elections, midterms, Migrant Caravan, millennial, Millennials, minority, mixed race, model minority, money, mortality, multicultural, multiculturalism, Muslim, Muslim-American, nationalism, New American Dimensions, Oakland BBQ, Obama, Orlando, Oscars, Pew, Philadelphia, police, politics, Poll, polling, polls, president, Pride, pride parades, progressive, psychology, Puerto Rico, race, racial, racial bias, racial disparity, racial profiling, racism, racist, representation, Republican, research, RFK, Rust Belt, SCOTUS, Senate, sexual orientation, sexual racism, shooting, slavery, South, South Carolina, South Carolina shooting, Spanish, stand your ground, Starbucks, statehood, stereotype, Stonewall, Stonewall riots, stress, subprime, suicide, Supreme Court, tariffs, teens, trade, transgender, Trudeau, Trump, Tuskegee, TV, U.S., Uncategorized, undocumented, United, Univision, violence, voting, white, white Americans, white history, White House, white majority, white nationalism, white nationals, white resentment, white supremacy, White women, White working class, whites, xenophobia, Yale dorm

We’ve just seen the first two contests of the 2016 elections, and just in time, there’s a new paper from the University of California, San Diego, that shows what we already suspected. That is, voter ID laws dampen turnout for minorities.

Voter ID laws adversely affected the turnout of minorities, and particularly that of Latinos, the paper found. The study also revealed that turnout among Democrats was disproportionately affected, backing up claims of a political motivation behind the laws, which have been overwhelmingly championed by GOP legislators.

It is the first comprehensive study that’s been done over many election cycles that very clearly shows how minority voters are affected, and how they’re adversely and disproportionately affected compared to their white counterparts, the authors say.

Lajevardi, a Ph.D. candidate in UC-San Diego’s department of political science, is joined on the study by lead author Zoltan L. Hajnal , a political science professor there and with Lindsay Nielson, a post-Doctoral fellow. They examined not just the turnout, but the gap among racial groups compared with white voters. Looking at states with strict photo ID laws in elections from 2006 through 2012, they found, where they are enacted, racial, and ethnic minorities are less apt to vote.

Not only have the numbers of states passing voter ID laws grown considerably since the Supreme Court approved of Indiana’s photo ID law in 2008, the requirements in the laws have also gotten stricter. The paper’s authors thus focused attention on “strict” photo ID laws, meaning those “that prevent the voter from casting a regular ballot if they cannot present appropriate identification.” Seven states have strict photo ID laws in place, by the study’s count.

In general elections, states with strict photo ID laws show a Latino turnout 10.3 points lower than in states without them, the study showed. The law also affected turnout in primary elections, where Latino turnout decreased by 6.3 points and Black turnout by 1.6 points.

25
Jan

Latino paradox: higher poverty but longer lives

POSTED BY Admin POSTED IN Uncategorized POST TAGGED 1950s, 2016, 2020, 9-1-1, Aaron Schlossberg, ads, African American, AirBNB, American, Americans, Asia, Asian, Asian-American, Asian-Americans, Asians, banking, Ben Carson, bias, bigotry, bilingual, bisexual, black, Black history, Black Lives Matter, black men, Blacks, Brexit, Bush, census, census 2020, Chinese, Chris Rock, civil rights, colectivismo, commencement, community, Confederate, Congress, conservative, culture, David Dao, democrat, demographics, disparity, District of Columbia, diversity, economics, education, election, election 2016, elections, electoral college, Emma Stone, employment, English, ethnicity, Europe, evangelical, family, fear, film, food, Fox News, Fresh Kitchen, gay, George Wallace, German, German-American, hate, hate crime, Hawaii, health, health care, health insurance, Hillary Clinton, Hispanic, history, Hollywood, housing crisis, ICE, immigrant, immigrants, immigration, immigration and nationality act, immigration attitudes, immigration trends, Indian, JFK, jobs, John Cho, justice, kavanaugh, Kennedy, Korean, language, Latino, Latino millennial, Latinx, lesbian, LGBT, MAGA, marketing, Martin Luther King, McCain, McKinley Texas, media, media coverage, Mexican, Mexicans, Mexico, midterm elections, midterms, Migrant Caravan, millennial, Millennials, minority, mixed race, model minority, money, mortality, multicultural, multiculturalism, Muslim, Muslim-American, nationalism, New American Dimensions, Oakland BBQ, Obama, Orlando, Oscars, Pew, Philadelphia, police, politics, Poll, polling, polls, president, Pride, pride parades, progressive, psychology, Puerto Rico, race, racial, racial bias, racial disparity, racial profiling, racism, racist, representation, Republican, research, RFK, Rust Belt, SCOTUS, Senate, sexual orientation, sexual racism, shooting, slavery, South, South Carolina, South Carolina shooting, Spanish, stand your ground, Starbucks, statehood, stereotype, Stonewall, Stonewall riots, stress, subprime, suicide, Supreme Court, tariffs, teens, trade, transgender, Trudeau, Trump, Tuskegee, TV, U.S., Uncategorized, undocumented, United, Univision, violence, voting, white, white Americans, white history, White House, white majority, white nationalism, white nationals, white resentment, white supremacy, White women, White working class, whites, xenophobia, Yale dorm

Hispanic_Poverty_Longevity400

Despite nearly a quarter of U.S. Latinos living in poverty, the group as a whole has a higher average life expectancies than white Americans, who have a much lower poverty rate.

This article from Yes magazine has some theories as to why. It’s about Latino traditions of food, community and family bonds.

Author Claudia Kolker took a closer look at such cultural practices for her 2011 book, The Immigrant Advantage. Her book examines why immigrants are often healthier than native-born Americans—a question that continues to be explored. Some credit this perplexing phenomenon to the idea that immigrants must be healthy to migrate. Kolker’s research shows its connection to customs like Danza Azteca: close community bonds, traditional foods, and la cuarentena, a Latin American tradition in which a new mother rests for the first 40 days after giving birth, not lifting a finger except to breastfeed and bond with her child. Kolker also has a hunch that a lack of smoking is a factor, and other researchers agree.

But here’s another paradox. The healthier living advantage is primarily for recent immigrants.

U.S.-born Hispanics face higher prevalence rates for unhealthy behaviors than foreign-born Hispanics: a 72 percent higher smoking rate and a 30 percent higher obesity rate. They also have a 93 percent higher cancer rate, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Timothy Smith, a psychology professor at Brigham Young University, also has studied this scientific wonder and suggests that social bonds and culture do contribute to health. While more research is needed to know for sure, one thing is certain: American assimilation isn’t exactly healthy. “They’re adopting the local culture, which does have some adverse consequences,” he says. “There are positive consequences to health and adverse consequences.”

Read more about the paradox here.

18
Jan

Latin identity on the Presidential stage

POSTED BY Admin POSTED IN Uncategorized POST TAGGED 1950s, 2016, 2020, 9-1-1, Aaron Schlossberg, ads, African American, AirBNB, American, Americans, Asia, Asian, Asian-American, Asian-Americans, Asians, banking, Ben Carson, bias, bigotry, bilingual, bisexual, black, Black history, Black Lives Matter, black men, Blacks, Brexit, Bush, census, census 2020, Chinese, Chris Rock, civil rights, colectivismo, commencement, community, Confederate, Congress, conservative, culture, David Dao, democrat, demographics, disparity, District of Columbia, diversity, economics, education, election, election 2016, elections, electoral college, Emma Stone, employment, English, ethnicity, Europe, evangelical, family, fear, film, food, Fox News, Fresh Kitchen, gay, George Wallace, German, German-American, hate, hate crime, Hawaii, health, health care, health insurance, Hillary Clinton, Hispanic, history, Hollywood, housing crisis, ICE, immigrant, immigrants, immigration, immigration and nationality act, immigration attitudes, immigration trends, Indian, JFK, jobs, John Cho, justice, kavanaugh, Kennedy, Korean, language, Latino, Latino millennial, Latinx, lesbian, LGBT, MAGA, marketing, Martin Luther King, McCain, McKinley Texas, media, media coverage, Mexican, Mexicans, Mexico, midterm elections, midterms, Migrant Caravan, millennial, Millennials, minority, mixed race, model minority, money, mortality, multicultural, multiculturalism, Muslim, Muslim-American, nationalism, New American Dimensions, Oakland BBQ, Obama, Orlando, Oscars, Pew, Philadelphia, police, politics, Poll, polling, polls, president, Pride, pride parades, progressive, psychology, Puerto Rico, race, racial, racial bias, racial disparity, racial profiling, racism, racist, representation, Republican, research, RFK, Rust Belt, SCOTUS, Senate, sexual orientation, sexual racism, shooting, slavery, South, South Carolina, South Carolina shooting, Spanish, stand your ground, Starbucks, statehood, stereotype, Stonewall, Stonewall riots, stress, subprime, suicide, Supreme Court, tariffs, teens, trade, transgender, Trudeau, Trump, Tuskegee, TV, U.S., Uncategorized, undocumented, United, Univision, violence, voting, white, white Americans, white history, White House, white majority, white nationalism, white nationals, white resentment, white supremacy, White women, White working class, whites, xenophobia, Yale dorm

The 2016 election is fascinating and unprecedented for several reasons. One reason is that there are two Latinos running for the GOP nomination, and are considered to be favorites of the party establishment. Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz are both freshmen senators, both are of Cuban ancestry, and both are sons of immigrants (though they don’t favor an easy pathway to citizenship for newcomers).

But that’s where the similarities end as far as how they wear their cultural heritage. This New York Times piece says that in their approach to their Hispanic identities — traits that can make or break their success in courting both Latino and non-Latino voters — the two sharply diverge, starting with their names and how Ted Cruze chose to anglicize his name.

His preference for Ted, a suggestion from Mr. Cruz’s Irish-American mother, infuriated his father, Rafael, who in 1957 fled Cuba for Texas after being arrested and beaten by agents for Fulgencio Batista, the Cuban dictator. “He viewed it as a rejection of him and his heritage, which was not my intention,” Mr. Cruz wrote. For two years, his father refused to call him Ted. Today, Mr. Cruz serves as his son’s Spanish-speaking surrogate.

The name change is but one example of how Mr. Cruz has de-emphasized his Latino identity. Unlike Mr. Rubio, Mr. Cruz had only his father and a few relatives to connect him to the island, its language and traditions. Once his father became a born-again Christian, religion, not ethnicity, appeared to dominate the Cruz household.

“His approach to all the people with whom we interacted was who they were, not what they were,” said David K. Panton, Mr. Cruz’s former roommate at Princeton University and Harvard Law School.

On the stump, Mr. Cruz has embraced his Cuban father’s story, more for what it says about America than what it says about immigrants. His father fled Cuba with $100 sewn into his underwear and worked as a dishwasher to help pay tuition at the University of Texas at Austin. “America, quite simply, saved my father,” Mr. Cruz wrote.

The story is a poignant one, but many Latinos have said it falls flat for one reason: The pride Mr. Cruz feels for his father is not one he extends to the larger immigrant community.

We would say to the GOP if they’re listening that they need to have a stronger understanding of the Latino communities in the U.S. There is a lot of talk in political circles about how Cruz or Rubio would attract Latinos just based on their roots. But the Latino community is hardly monolithic and, even more to the point, many Mexican-Americans could give a damn that a Cuban-American running for President.

If just having a Latino name on the ticket is the party’s idea of Latino outreach, they are going to be severely disappointed.

11
Jan

Is race preference in dating really racism?

POSTED BY Admin POSTED IN Uncategorized POST TAGGED 1950s, 2016, 2020, 9-1-1, Aaron Schlossberg, ads, African American, AirBNB, American, Americans, Asia, Asian, Asian-American, Asian-Americans, Asians, banking, Ben Carson, bias, bigotry, bilingual, bisexual, black, Black history, Black Lives Matter, black men, Blacks, Brexit, Bush, census, census 2020, Chinese, Chris Rock, civil rights, colectivismo, commencement, community, Confederate, Congress, conservative, culture, David Dao, democrat, demographics, disparity, District of Columbia, diversity, economics, education, election, election 2016, elections, electoral college, Emma Stone, employment, English, ethnicity, Europe, evangelical, family, fear, film, food, Fox News, Fresh Kitchen, gay, George Wallace, German, German-American, hate, hate crime, Hawaii, health, health care, health insurance, Hillary Clinton, Hispanic, history, Hollywood, housing crisis, ICE, immigrant, immigrants, immigration, immigration and nationality act, immigration attitudes, immigration trends, Indian, JFK, jobs, John Cho, justice, kavanaugh, Kennedy, Korean, language, Latino, Latino millennial, Latinx, lesbian, LGBT, MAGA, marketing, Martin Luther King, McCain, McKinley Texas, media, media coverage, Mexican, Mexicans, Mexico, midterm elections, midterms, Migrant Caravan, millennial, Millennials, minority, mixed race, model minority, money, mortality, multicultural, multiculturalism, Muslim, Muslim-American, nationalism, New American Dimensions, Oakland BBQ, Obama, Orlando, Oscars, Pew, Philadelphia, police, politics, Poll, polling, polls, president, Pride, pride parades, progressive, psychology, Puerto Rico, race, racial, racial bias, racial disparity, racial profiling, racism, racist, representation, Republican, research, RFK, Rust Belt, SCOTUS, Senate, sexual orientation, sexual racism, shooting, slavery, South, South Carolina, South Carolina shooting, Spanish, stand your ground, Starbucks, statehood, stereotype, Stonewall, Stonewall riots, stress, subprime, suicide, Supreme Court, tariffs, teens, trade, transgender, Trudeau, Trump, Tuskegee, TV, U.S., Uncategorized, undocumented, United, Univision, violence, voting, white, white Americans, white history, White House, white majority, white nationalism, white nationals, white resentment, white supremacy, White women, White working class, whites, xenophobia, Yale dorm

According to a new study, it is.

The study published in Archives of Sexual Behavior entitled “Is Sexual Racism Really Racism?” took a look at gay and bisexual men and their dating preferences and found results that could have implications for the general public.

The researchers asked over 2,000 gay and bisexual Australian men how they felt about race and dating through an online survey. These men also completed a region-specific version of the Quick Discrimination Index (QDI), a standard survey instrument that measures attitudes on race and diversity. After putting these two data sets together the authors concluded: “Sexual racism… is closely associated with generic racist attitudes, which challenges the idea of racial attraction as solely a matter of personal preference.”

The Daily Beast breaks down these findings and applies them to common phrases seen on dating websites and apps, phrases that are often prefaced by some variation on “I’m not a racist, but…”

If you’re a gay man, phrases like “no blacks” and “no Asians” aren’t just words that you’d find on old signs in a civil rights museum, they are an unavoidable and current feature of your online dating experience. On gay dating apps like Grindr and Scruff, some men post blunt and often offensive disclaimers on their profiles such as “no oldies,” “no fems,” and “no fatties.” Among the most ubiquitous are racial disclaimers like “no blacks” and “no Asians,” which are most frequently posted by white men but, as Edwards’s case proves, not always.

Sometimes, men even use foods as metaphors for entire ethnic groups: “No rice” to deter Asian men, “no spice” to keep the Latinos away, and “no curry” to tell Indians they don’t have a shot.

Those who deploy these disclaimers defend themselves from accusations of “racism” by claiming that they merely have “preferences” for certain races over others. Wrote one gay blogger, “Don’t tell me I can’t have a preference! I don’t want to have sex with women. No hard feelings. Does that make me a misogynist?” Others have argued that it is impossible to separate the language of so-called sexual racism from racism in other spheres of life. There is a reason, they insist, that men of color are most often pushed to the sexual wayside. “No whites” is a much less popular slogan.

Emphasis ours.

Though the study focuses on gay and bisexual men looking for male partners, the researchers aren’t suggesting that gay or bisexual men engage in more racial discrimination than their heterosexual counterparts or lesbians for that matter. Rather, they suggest that the behavior is just racism disguised in the language of desire, which theoretically a person of any sexual orientation could be afflicted with. From the author of the study:

“While it may feel like our desires are our own, in reality they are influenced heavily by social norms,” explained Callander. “For me, the findings of this study are a reminder that even though society and individuals may actively reject racism, racial prejudices are increasingly subtle and they can find their way into even the most private and personal corners of our lives.”

We’re very interested in seeing whether heterosexuals seeking partners use the same phrases – no spice, no rice – or whether their sexual racism takes a different form.

 

 

27
Jan

The GOP’s new Latino problem: Trump

POSTED BY Admin POSTED IN Uncategorized POST TAGGED 1950s, 2016, 2020, 9-1-1, Aaron Schlossberg, ads, African American, AirBNB, American, Americans, Asia, Asian, Asian-American, Asian-Americans, Asians, banking, Ben Carson, bias, bigotry, bilingual, bisexual, black, Black history, Black Lives Matter, black men, Blacks, Brexit, Bush, census, census 2020, Chinese, Chris Rock, civil rights, colectivismo, commencement, community, Confederate, Congress, conservative, culture, David Dao, democrat, demographics, disparity, District of Columbia, diversity, economics, education, election, election 2016, elections, electoral college, Emma Stone, employment, English, ethnicity, Europe, evangelical, family, fear, film, food, Fox News, Fresh Kitchen, gay, George Wallace, German, German-American, hate, hate crime, Hawaii, health, health care, health insurance, Hillary Clinton, Hispanic, history, Hollywood, housing crisis, ICE, immigrant, immigrants, immigration, immigration and nationality act, immigration attitudes, immigration trends, Indian, JFK, jobs, John Cho, justice, kavanaugh, Kennedy, Korean, language, Latino, Latino millennial, Latinx, lesbian, LGBT, MAGA, marketing, Martin Luther King, McCain, McKinley Texas, media, media coverage, Mexican, Mexicans, Mexico, midterm elections, midterms, Migrant Caravan, millennial, Millennials, minority, mixed race, model minority, money, mortality, multicultural, multiculturalism, Muslim, Muslim-American, nationalism, New American Dimensions, Oakland BBQ, Obama, Orlando, Oscars, Pew, Philadelphia, police, politics, Poll, polling, polls, president, Pride, pride parades, progressive, psychology, Puerto Rico, race, racial, racial bias, racial disparity, racial profiling, racism, racist, representation, Republican, research, RFK, Rust Belt, SCOTUS, Senate, sexual orientation, sexual racism, shooting, slavery, South, South Carolina, South Carolina shooting, Spanish, stand your ground, Starbucks, statehood, stereotype, Stonewall, Stonewall riots, stress, subprime, suicide, Supreme Court, tariffs, teens, trade, transgender, Trudeau, Trump, Tuskegee, TV, U.S., Uncategorized, undocumented, United, Univision, violence, voting, white, white Americans, white history, White House, white majority, white nationalism, white nationals, white resentment, white supremacy, White women, White working class, whites, xenophobia, Yale dorm

Remember way back to 2013, when Barack Obama had won re-election and his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney, captured an anemic share of the Latino vote? The Republican national party did a post-mortem on what went wrong, and came up with a must-do prescription: reach out to more African American, Asian, and Latino voters:

The $10 million outreach effort to includes hiring national political directors for Hispanic, Asian-Pacific and African American voters and elevating minorities within the party. “We’ve done a real lousy job sometimes of bragging about the success that we’ve had” with minorities, in particular Hispanic candidates, Priebus said. To target African Americans, he plans to launch a pilot project in 2013 mayoral races aimed at identifying and turning out potential supporters in urban areas.

Fast forward to summer of 2015. The GOP front-runner is a celebrity businessman who launched his bid for the nomination by calling Mexican immigrants rapists and murderers.

Not surprisingly, Gallup’s daily tracking poll finds Donald Trump doing unbelievably awful among Latino voters, with 65 percent viewing him unfavorably and 14 percent favorably for a net favorable score of -51.

Again, in a crowded GOP field, Trump is the front-runner. And he’s sucking up all the media oxygen. What’s more dispiriting to those who would like politicians of any party to engage in less incendiary rhetoric, the other GOP candidates are doing a “me too.”

Jeb Bush dropped the “anchor babies” bomb last week. You know, that’s where hordes of Mexican women cross the border and have their babies, thereby “anchoring” them in the U.S., giving them sweet, sweet, citizenship. It’s considered a pejorative, and frankly there’s not much evidence that this so-called practice is a big issue in immigration. But it sure does rile up nativist voters. Then this week Jeb launched his “insult every group” strategy by clarifying that in using the anchor babies term, he was really referring to Asians.

Oh yes, he did. Now, in 2015, walk-backs include a high kick to the face of someone else.

The GOP candidates are dancing to Trump’s tune. It’s ugly and it’s pathetic. And the longer it goes on the slimmer any GOP candidate’s chances are of capturing minority votes. So much for that 2013 post-mortem.

The latest flap includes Trump removing Gorge Ramos of Univision from his press conference. For trying to ask a question about Trump’s immigration plan, aside from his stated plan that “it’s all about management,” and “we’ll build a beautiful wall.”

“Go back to Univision,” he told Ramos. Sounds a little like “go back to Mexico,” doesn’t it?

The political site Talkingpointsmemo.com makes the case that Trump’s actions will have a scorched earth effect, keeping Latinos and other minorities away from the party not just in this election, but for many elections to come:

As the New York Times reported, it’s not just Ramos, but Spanish-speaking media on the whole has been more critical of Trump than general market news. Analysis by the nonpartisan media analytics company Two.42.Solutions showed that 80 percent of Spanish-speaking media coverage of Trump focused on his immigration views — as opposed to 58 percent of Trump’s mention in mainstream news — and that coverage has been largely negative, according to the Times.

According to a separate soon-to-be published study by Sergio I. Garcia-Rios, a Latino Studies professor at Cornell University, Latinos who pay close attention to Spanish-speaking media are more likely to be politically active.

“This is not only media, it is media in Spanish, and for the most part we understand that as being Jorge Ramos,” Garcia-Rios told TPM. “This is even among English speakers, who prefer to use English at home. Those who watch news in Spanish, they’re more likely to be excited about politics and more likely to participate.”

Yep. And they’re more likely to vote for the Democrat. If Trump prevails in winning the nomination, something unthinkable just a few months ago, he may have negative coattails, hurting GOP candidates’ chances down ticket across the country. The GOP will be seen as a white nativist anti-immigrant party, riding that tiger all the way to defeat for a generation.